DistrictCampusDirectory
CAMPUS

Counselor

SANDY MOORE

JR. HIGH COUNSELOR

 

 

 

INDIVIDUAL & GROUP COUNSELING

 

CLASSROOM GUIDANCE

 

TESTING

 

CAREER COUNSELING

 

SCHEDULING, GPA'S, AND TRANSCRIPT'S

 

REPORT CARDS

 

ESCHOOL

 

BULLYING & SUICIDE PREVENTION

 

SCHOLARSHIPS

 

ACADEMICS

 

ORIENTATION & PEER FACILITATION

 

RESEARCH & PROFESSIONAL GROWTH

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

 

https://www.nokidhungry.org/

 

Millions of kids in America don't get enough food at home, making it almost impossible for them to focus and do well in school.

Let's make sure every kid in America has a chance to do their best.

Donate to provide meals

 

Ending Childhood Hunger in Arkansas

 

HUNGER AT A GLANCE

1 in 4
of kids in Arkansas struggle with hunger
251,000
low-income children in Arkansas receive free or reduced-price lunch.

THE PROBLEM
All of these kids are eligible for other critical meals, but too many are missing out.
ONLY 58%
of children eating free or reduced-price school lunch are getting school breakfast.
ONLY 23%
of children eating free or reduced-price school lunches are getting summer meals.

 

Can one person really make a difference?

Every person makes a difference in the fight to end childhood hunger. Our network of teachers, parents, community leaders, kids, teens, chefs, and volunteers from all walks of life take actions big and small to help connect kids with nutritious food where they live, learn and play. It all starts when you take the No Kid Hungry Pledge and learn about ways to get involved.

Whether you are a teacher sharing stories of hunger in your classroom, an employee asking your colleagues or online community to join in the fight, a mother writing Congress to tell them to protect critical programs that help feed hungry kids, a restaurateur raising funds during our Dine Out For No Kid Hungry promotion in September, or a chef who volunteers their time at a to teach a Cooking Matters course, visit policymakers during lobbying days in Washington, D.C. or participating in one of our Taste of the Nation culinary events across the country, every action and every dollar counts. And because of our unique No Kid Hungry model, every dollar you donate can help connect a child in need with up to 10 meals. Donate now.

 

To Make a Donation by Mail or Phone

Share Our Strength
P.O. Box 75475
Baltimore, MD 21275-5475
Or call 1-800-222-1767

For donor services, please send an email to

mailto:contactus@strength.org

 

Donate to help end childhood hunger

 

           The No Kid Hungry campaign has taken major steps to end child hunger in America, including state and city-based

           campaigns in all 50 states. And yet, 1 out of every 5 kids in America struggles with hunger and aren’t getting

           the resources they need.  Childhood hunger is a major problem  in our country - but it is solvable.  Donate

           to feed hungry kids and help us end child hunger in America.

 

 

1030 15th Street, NW, Suite 1100 W
Washington DC 20005
(800) 969-4767

 


 

 

 

http://give.kelloggs.com/en_US/home.html

 

At Kellogg’s, we believe every kid deserves the benefits of breakfast. That’s why we’re striving to make breakfast in the classroom a reality in more schools nationwide.

 

Help give students the breakfast they need

Hunger is a shadow hanging over too many kids. But together we can shine a light and diminish its effects. Join us in helping give kids something they can count on each morning:
a complete breakfast and a better start.

Take Action

 

Contact Us

Community

Join the Kellogg's Community

 

Click here to get answers to your questions, help others, or voice an idea.


  Do you have a general inquiry? Please complete our Contact us Form

 

Still have a question? Contact us.
phone

Call Consumer Affairs

1-800-962-1413 (Monday - Friday 9 AM to 6 PM ET)

write

Write Us:

Kellogg's Consumer Affairs
P.O. Box CAMB
Battle Creek, MI 49016

®, ™, © 2011 Kellogg Co.

 

 

 


 

 

 

DE QUEEN MISSION STATEMENTS

 

THE DE QUEEN JR. HIGH SCHOOL MISSION STATEMENT

The community, staff, and students of De Queen Junior High School will work together in a reflective partnership to provide a safe, healthy, and educational environment where all can learn to be valuable member of today's technological society.

 

COUNSELING PROGRAM MISSION STATEMENT

Building a school counseling program that is developmentally comprehensive and addresses the academic, career, and personal/social domains of all students is the mission of De Queen Public Schools.  The school counselor strives to be an advocate for the child and is willing to partner with other educators, parents/guardians, and the community to accomplish this goal.  Students will be supported in their efforts to maximize their potential and achievement with the knowledge and skills to meet their goals as productive members of society. 

 

THE ROLE OF SCHOOL COUNSELORS IN ARKANSAS PUBLIC SCHOOLS

School counselors help all students by establishing individual, group and classroom contacts with them, collaborating with teachers, and coordinating with other school or community guidance resources.  The clinical skills and knowledge base of the counselor is more effectively used if effort is directed in an organized way toward making the school, the teachers and the curriculum sensitive to those aspects of personal development most associated with life success.

Counselors serve different school populations and function differently, due primarily to variations in the developmental stages of students and in school organization.  Whatever the setting, however, counseling and guidance are functions integral to the school, which are maximized when counselors collaborate with others. 

 

       SANDY MOORE                                                          

 

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                    

 

PROGRAM GOALS AND OBJECTIVES

GOAL I:  To assist students in the process of growing in personal, social, educational and career development.

OBJECTIVES:

A.   PERSONAL DEVELOPMENT -  The counselor will assist students with the following:

1.  Establish and maintain a sense of personal worth and a positive self-image

2.  Develop and cultivate appropriate emotional responses to life experiences and

3. Understand their roles and responsibilities in school, family and community.

 

B.  SOCIAL DEVELOPMENT - The counselor will assist students with following:

1.  Develop and maintain effective interpersonal skills

2. Understand the roles and responsibilities of others in school, family and community

3. Acquire a knowledge of and respect for individual differences in abilities, interests, attitudes and backgrounds.

 

C.  EDUCATIONAL DEVELOPMENT - THE COUNSELOR WILL ASSIST STUDENTS WITH THE FOLLOWING:

1.  Achieve at a level in keeping with their potential

2.  Develop a sense of discovery about new knowledge

3.  Recognize academic strengths, weaknesses and areas of need

 

D.  CAREER DEVELOPMENT - THE COUNSELOR WILL ASSIST STUDENTS WITH THE FOLLOWING:

1.  Discover the meaning of work and its relationship to the individual

2.  Develop a positive attitude and a personal identity as a worker who contributes to self and to social needs

3.  Understand their own aptitudes and develop their own abilities as they pertain to the world of work

 

GOAL II.  TO ASSIST STUDENTS TO APPROPRIATELY COPE WITH CRISIS SITUATIONS THROUGH THE ACQUISITION OF EFFECTIVE PROBLEM-SOLVING SKILLS.

OBJECTIVES:  THE COUNSELOR WILL ASSIST STUDENTS WITH THE FOLLOWING:

A.  Develop strategies for exploring alternatives that allow students to successfully deal with problem situations

B.  Evaluate, select, and implement the appropriate solutions to problems.

 

GOAL III:  TO ASSIST THE SCHOOL STAFF IN ITS EFFORTS TO PROMOTE THE DEVELOPMENTAL GROWTH OF STUDENTS.

OBJECTIVES:  THE COUNSELOR WILL ASSIST STAFF WITH THE FOLLOWING:

A.  Promoting a positive learning atmosphere

B.  Promoting an understanding of the role of school personnel in the guidance program

C.  Enhancing their counseling skills through consultation and other staff development activities

D.  Encouraging the recognition and use of affective skills in the teaching-learning process

 

GOAL IV:  TO ASSIST THE FAMILY IN ITS EFFORTS TO UNDERSTAND THE DEVELOPMENTAL GROWTH OF CHILDREN.

OBJECTIVES:  THE COUNSELOR WILL ASSIST FAMILIES BY:

A.  Promoting effective communication among the parents, school staff and children

B.  Enhancing parenting skills that will promote the positive personal, social, educational and career development of children.

 

 

 

 


 

 

ANTI-BULLYING POLICY

 

In accordance with Act 681 of 2003, it is the policy of De Queen Schools that no child will be bullied, harassed or intimidated.  Bullying is defined as any written or verbal expression or physical act or gesture, or a pattern thereof that is intended to cause distress or fear upon one or more students.  A student will be found violating this policy if his/her conduct has been found to have the effect of humiliation or embarrassment on a student and is sufficiently severe, persistent, or pervasive that it limits the student's ability to participate in or benefit from an educational program or activity.  A student who has been found in violation of this act may be suspended from one to ten days and may be expelled for the remainder of the semester if the bullying persists.

 

De Queen School District has posted the following "Steps to Report Bullying" in high traffic areas around the campuses of the De Queen Schools:

1.  Tell the person to stop.

2.  Don't smile; be firm.

3.  Talk to an adult (teacher, counselor, parent, administrator).

 

 

 

 


 

 

What Does the Arkansas Council on Military Children Do?

As part of the Interstate Compact on Education Opportunity for Military Children, the Arkansas Council on Military Children helps to ensure the uniform treatment of military children transferring between school districts and states.

What Kinds of Issues Do Military Children Face?

Due to frequent relocations in service to our country, military families encounter school challenges for their children’s enrollment, eligibility, placement and graduation.

What Children Are Eligible for Assistance by the Council?

Children of

  1. Active duty members of the uniformed services, National Guard and Reserve on active duty orders
  2. Members or veterans who are medically discharged or retired for (1) year
  3. Members who die on active duty

What Are Some Specific Educational Issues that the Council Addresses?

Enrollment - Educational records, immunizations, kindergarten & first grade

entrance age, placement & attendance, course & educational program placement, special education services, placement flexibility, absence related to deployment activities

Eligibility - Eligibility for student enrollment, eligibility for extracurricular participation

Graduation - Waiving courses required for graduation if similar course work has been completed, flexibility in accepting state exit or end-of-course exams, national achievement tests, or alternative testing in lieu of testing requirements for graduation in the receiving state, allowing a student to receive a diploma from the sending school instead of the receiving school

Whom Do I Contact for Help or More Information?

John I. Kaminar

Commissioner

Arkansas Council on Military Children

Arkansas Department of Education

Four Capitol Mall, Room 404-A

Little Rock, Arkansas 72201

501-683-5188

john.kaminar@arkansas.gov

 

 

Brittany Kincaid

Compact Support

Arkansas Department of Education

Four Capitol Mall, Room 302-A

Little Rock, AR 72201

501-682-4251

brittany.kincaid@arkansas.gov

 

 


 

 

 

CUBS RULE!

 

 

 


 

 

 

WPS!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

 

 

Contact Sandy Moore

School Phone:
870-642-3077

Sandy Moore

Upcoming Events

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